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Saturday, 15 December 2018 13:21

World Best Dive Sites - Ulong Channel Palau

Amongst the many fantastic dive sites in Palau there are three which are a must for every scuba diver. Blue Corner Palau as one of the single best dives in the world and famous for its sharks and described in our blog The magic of diving Blue Corner Palau - German Channel Palau known for manta madness and last but not least Ulong Channel Palau known for sharks, grouper mating and its beautiful corals.

When you dive Ulong Channel, you’ll have it all. Dropping at the mouth of the channel you’ll observe sometimes hundreds of reef sharks amongst other schooling fish. Drifting in to the channel is as exciting - fantastic soft and hard corals, beautiful sea fans and, depending on season and moon phase, mating groupers, sharks or triggers.

Following is a description of the dive sites and a collection of videos - enjoy your virtual dive with Fish ’n Fins' FNF MAG.

Diving Ulong Channel Palau

Ulong Island Palau - Location of the dive site

The dive site is located on the West side of Ulong Island

Distance from Koror: 15 miles (24 kilometers) west of Koror, 30-40 minutes by speedboat.
The following map is interactive ...
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Visibility: 45 to 90 feet (15 to 30 meters): Depending on the direction of the tide. Visibility is best during an incoming tide when the current is strong and the water clear.
Level of Diving Experience: Advanced. Diving Depth Summary: Top of the Reef to the Bottom: 10 to 40 feet (3 to 13 meters).
Currents: The currents at Ulong Channel can be strong and unpredictable. It's not uncommon to have the direction of the current change abruptly halfway through the dive. If this is the case, simply turn around and drift in the opposite direction.

General Information

This channel is sometimes referred to as Ngerumekaol Pass. Due to the close proximity of Ulong Island it is commonly known as Ulong Channel. Ulong Island is a great place for a picnic because of its beautiful beaches and its historical significance. Ancient Palauans painted a series of petroglyphs on the high cliffs of the island. Be sure to have your Dive Guide point out the petroglyphs as you pass the western side of Ulong Island.

Ulong Channel Palau Reef Map

Reef Formation

Ulong Channel runs west to east and cuts only partially through the western barrier reef. The barrier reef runs perpendicular to the channel. The sandy bottom of the channel is 10 to 40 feet (3 to 13 meters) deep and is decorated with numerous coral heads and coral formations. The sides of the channel start just below the surface and gradually slope toward the sandy bottom.

The Rich Marine Life at Ulong Channel Palau

Gray Reef Sharks, sting rays, schools of jacks, snappers, barracuda, and batfish are frequently seen at the entrance. When the moon is full, during the months of April, May, June and July, thousands of groupers gather here to spawn. Groupers are usually a solitary fish, but during this time they have been seen to school. Titan Triggerfish also use this area to nest. When Titan Triggerfish are nesting they become extremely territorial and protective of their nest sites. Titan Triggerfish will dig out large depressions in the sandy bottom to lay their eggs. To avoid being attacked and bitten by jealous triggerfish, divers should keep their distance.

Shark mating at Ulong Channel Palau

Diving the famous Ulong Channel Palau

The dive usually starts along the reef at the northern side of the channel by dropping down to 60 feet (20 m). Keep the reef on your left side. About 10 minutes into the dive you will approach a sandy run-off, this is the entrance tothe channel. Grey Reef and White Tip Sharks are always on patrol here and the current is usually strong. Hook on to one of the rocks and watch the action. Once you leave this area be prepared for one of the most exciting drift dives in Palau. Let the current carry you into the channel. One of the most impressive sights the diver will see is an enormous section of lettuce coral that has grown from the bottom of the channel to a height of 15-20 feet (5 to 7 m). The eastern end of the channel is deeper and the bottom is mostly sand.

Nitrox free of charge for all Nitrox certified divers

Fascinating Facts about Ulong Channel

Titan Triggerfish nests may have as many as 430,000 eggs clustered together in a fist-sized ball. When Triggerfish are nesting they can become quite nasty. Keep your distance!

Baby Sharks at Ulong Channel Palau

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Friday, 14 December 2018 11:59

Through the lens of Gerald Nowak

At Fish 'n Fins we take very good care of Underwater Photographers. Our boats are spacious providing ample room for photographers and camera rigs, no matter what size and make. Our dive guides know every inch of Palau's reefs and are very enthusiastic to find great photo opportunities or be models in wide angle shots with sharks, WWII wrecks or colorful corals.

In our FNF MAG segment about semi-Pro and Pro Underwater Photographers who have been diving with Fish 'n Fins we'd like to introduce German photo journalist Gerald Nowak.


About Gerald Nowak

Gerald Nowak was born in 1964 in the five-lake country south-west of Munich. At the age of 12, he had contact with a photo camera for the first time. At that time borrowed from his parents, he already got his first own SLR camera when he was 16 years old.

In 1981 at the age of 17 he began to dive in Bavarian lakes. In 1989 after a stay in tropical waters it became his hobby and shortly afterwards he combined his two passions into his current profession. Among other things, he has worked continuously for the German and international diving press for many years and is a regular photographer for German magazines TAUCHEN, UNTERWASSER, SILENT WORLD and DIVEMASTER.

Sharks in Palau by Gerald Nowak

As a photographer, Gerald is always on the quest for news and has won prizes in several national and international photography competitions. In the 90s he was an Indonesian champion at a competition in Kalimantan.

Since 1994 he has been working full time as an underwater and travel photographer for various travel and special interest magazines as well as internet portals and travel book publishers.

Gerald Nowak has been working together with Mares since the mid-1990s.

In 1997 he gotten to know his wife Sibylle Gerlinger. Since that time they have been working as travel journalists together. Sibylle writes the stories and Gerald shoots the pictures. Sometimes it`s the other way around......

Both are able to swap their work.

Model with Nautilus in Palau by Gerald Nowak


Gerald as Dive Instructor

Gerald is an instructor trainer at the dive association CMAS Germany (FST) and Instructor at SSI, photo instructor in several associations, Trimix and Rebreather diver, as well as an impassioned ice-, wreck- and cave-diver.

Mandarin Fish in Palau by Gerald Nowak

Whether tropical, temperate or cool waters, everything that promises exciting reports or great pictures awakens his interest. His special commitment is to the threatened shark species. His most favorite marine animal being the graceful hunters of the ocean: fox- and blue- shark, but also the sublime tiger shark. For the protection of the sea and the animals, he is active in several animal protection organizations and supports them with information and photo material, which he collects on his worldwide journeys.

Coral photo in Palau by Gerald Nowak


Scuba Diving Palau - quoting Gerald

What I particularly appreciate about Palau are the incredibly beautiful Drop-Offs, that are overgrown with huge soft corals. In front of it, lots of reef sharks patrol there, mantas filter just below the surface of the water and cross the large shoals of fish that can be found everywhere. Whether Jellyfish Lake or German Channel, Blue Corner or Ulong Channel, Chandelier Caves or Peleliu Express, there is so much to see and of course to take pictures of.

Manta Ray in Palau by Gerald Nowak

Photo Equipment

Nikon D800, Panasonic GH5, Seacam Underwater Housings, Seacam and Subtronic Strobes, Orcatorch lamps

More of Gerald's photos

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Follow Gerald Nowak

Tova arrived at the office with a smile on her lips, telling me that we were preparing our liveaboard Ocean Hunter III for a very special group, she added Mission Blue is heading to Palau to investigate MPA successes and challenges.

Mission Blue had chosen Palau for good reason - not only is Palau one of the “Last Great Places on Earth” according to National Geographic, a place of the world’s most remarkably vast biological diversity and home to more marine life species than most any other area of comparable size on Earth, it is also a place where people and government are dedicated with heart and soul to environmental protection and conservation.

Diving Palau isn’t complete without diving the world famous dive site Blue Corner. A dive ranking amongst the best in the world.

But what makes this dive site so special?

Due to its location and formation Blue Corner very often gets strong currents - currents which attract lots of schooling fish feeding on smaller organisms traveling with the current. This attracts big predators which are looking for schooling fish. On most days you’ll jump in the water, go down, drift towards the corner and have hundreds of fish and sharks around you as you make your way to the plateau.

Once hooked in on the plateau taking cover from the current you can just “hang” and enjoy the scenery - the sheer richness of sea-life surrounding you.

Many divers just visit Palau, despite the many attractions, for this fantastic and unique dive site.

Dive Site Location

Southwest reefs of the Palau Islands. Blue Corner is at the northwest end of Ngemelis Island.

Distance from Koror is 25 miles (46 km). 50 to 70 minutes by speedboat.

Fish 'n Fins dive boat

Visibility - On Incoming tide: 90+ feet (30+ meters). Outgoing tide: 45 to 60 feet (15 to 20 meters). Note: Some guides believe best visibility is brought in by an incoming tide with a so-called "outgoing current", a current that moves from Blue Holes to the Corner. 

Level of Diving Experience: Strong current - Experienced divers only. Moderate current - Intermediate divers. No current - All divers.

Important Notice: the currents at Blue Corner can change within seconds. Your dive guide is the best person to check with regarding the required level of experience.

Diving Depth Summary: 

0 to 30 feet (0 to 10 meters): the eastern side of the reef wall starts at 25feet (8 meters) and is covered with soft corals

30 to 60 feet (10 to 20 meters): the top of the wall at the plateau, the best depth for seeing the action on Blue Corner

60 to 90 feet (20 to 30 meters): the eastern reef wall and cavern at 75 feet (25 meters)

80 to 90 feet (25 to 30 meters): large variety of smaller gorgonian and lush formation of purple soft corals.

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Currents at Blue Corner Palau

The tides and currents around the world depend on the phase and position of the moon. Tides are at their highest and lowest points during full and new moon. In Palau the maximum tolerance between the tides is roughly 7 feet (2 meters). 

Two major factors create and govern the currents around the dive sites

1. The Equatorial/Counter Equatorial currents control the flow of water across the western pacific that governs the tidal action that affects Palau.

2. The lagoon: The island complex is surrounded by barrier reef. There are only a few channels that allow for the flow of water in and out of the lagoon during the tidal changes. For nearly 6 hours the outgoing tide will flow continuously out of the lagoon taking sediment and debris out to sea. When the moon completes a quarter orbit around the earth the tidal flow will shift. For the next 6 hours incoming tidal water will rush into the lagoon bringing in clear water from the open ocean.

The tides move forward approximately one hour everyday, a 12:00PM high tide will be a 1:00PM high tide the next day. During the outgoing tide visibility (as a rule) in the lagoon will decrease, due to the fact that the outgoing tide carries away sand and particles to the open sea through the channels in the barrier reef. During the incoming tide, clear water coming from the open ocean brings increased visibility along the reefs, channels and inside the lagoon. The current that runs along the western reefs of Palau turns at Blue Corner, hits the reef wall, flowing up and over the plateau bringing with it an abundance of clean water, plankton and algae.

This phenomenon occasionally creates very strong currents. As a rule of thumb the incoming tide will flow from south to north and the outgoing tide from north to south. The current at Blue Corner is stronger, shorter and hardest to predict at the half-moon phase of the lunar month. 

Group of sharks at Blue Corner Palau

General Information

Most dive magazines rate Blue Corner as the single best dive in the world. The formation of the reef, sheer walls and the large number of schooling fish make it a truly unique experience. There are three mooring buoys located along the reef. The eastern buoy, the central buoy and the western buoy. You can dive this site from two different directions, depending on the current. Generally, divers will begin the dive while their boat is moored to either the eastern or western buoy. The central buoy is rarely used to start the dive. 

Blue Corner Palau - Reef Formation

A vertical reef wall that runs south to north parallel to Ngemelis Island. The reef then turns toward the open sea and stretches out from East to West, creating a plateau at 45 to 60 feet (15 to 20 meters). Past Blue Corner the reef wall curves again and runs south to north. The wall drops from 30 to 1000 feet (10 to 330meters) or more and is covered with large variety of giant Gorgonian sea fans, hard corals and soft corals. The Eastern part of the plateau consists of large patches of sand. Massive coral heads and rocks are scattered throughout the sandy patches. The flat coral plateau on the west drops gently from 45 to 60 feet (15 to 20 meters) with colonies of cabbage corals as well as many varieties of hard and soft corals. 

Reef map of Blue Corner Palau of of the world's best dive sites

Marine Life at Blue Corner Palau

Blue Corner Palau is home to some of the largest schools of fish in the world, here you can see just about every kind of fish found in the tropical ocean. Sharks, Wahoo, Tuna, Hawks Bill and Green turtles, Eagle Rays, Giant Groupers, and Barracuda, to name but a few species. These denizens come in very close, in fact, closer than you can imagine.

You will experience encounters here that you will provide plenty of thrills and excitement as well as great stories to tellfriends. Blue Corner is said to offer the utmost photo opportunities in the world. According to the direction of the current, the pelagic fish will switch from one side of the corner to the other. Permanent residents at Blue corner are large schools of Jacks, Snappers, Chevron barracudas (usually on top of the plateau), Redtooth Triggerfish, Pyramid Butterflyfish, profuse numbers of small tropical fish and Palaus famous Napoleon Wrasse. Occasionally divers spot Great Hammerheads, Whale Sharks, Mantas, Marlin, Sailfish and whales.


Nitrox free of charge for all Nitrox certified divers

We recommend to dive Blue Corner on Nitrox - Nitrox is FREE for all Nitrox certified divers booked with Fish 'n Fins Palau.

Diving Blue Corner

Eastern Buoy - The dive guides usually refer to this as the incoming dive. The dive starts at canyon /cut that leads westward along a reef wall. Look for sleeping White Tip sharks on the sandy bottom of the eastern cut. Swim along the lush soft coral wall for approximately 300 feet (100 meters), you will come to a cavern with giant Gorgonian sea fans, look up, you will most likely see many gray reef sharks patrolling the reef wall along with big schools of Black Snappers and Big Eyed Jacks. If the current is mild it will carry you further along the wall towards the corner.

If you encounter a strong current, let it lift you to the ledge, at the top, using your reef hook hook-onto one of the rocks or dead corals. Now you are free to face the current and watch the parade of sharks and fish. You can move sideways (westward) by changing positions along the ledge all the way to the corner. When your bottom time is over, unhook yourself and drift along with the current, it will take you to the top of the plateau. On the plateau you will find more swirling schools of barracuda, snappers, wrasses, triggerfish, etc. The current will diminish as you drift westward. While you are finishing your dive, with a safety stop, you will have a panoramic view of the action on the Corner and the plateau.

Center Buoy - The center buoy is located above the cavern. It is not recommended to start the dive here during strong currents, as you will find it difficult to reach the top of the plateau.

Schooling barracudas at Blue Corner Palau

Western Buoy - A dive that begins here is called the Out-Going dive. The wall starts at the Blue Hole and curves around south to the Blue Corner. The formation of the reef wall on this side is steeper and plunges beyond a diving depth into the sea. Keep a watch on your depth gauge, it is easy to drift down as you are caught up in the spectacle of action along the reef and out to sea. Look for large schools of yellow and white Pyramid Butterflyfish, Moorish Idols and Redtooth Triggerfish.

The top of the reef is 10 to15 feet (3 to 5 meters). As you get closer to the Blue Corner the reef wall begins to gradually slope outward to form the edge of the Corner. On the outgoing tide, if the dive started at the Blue Hole, you will have to kick against the current until you reach the center buoy. From that point the current will carry you along the reef wall to Blue Corner. As you reach the edge of the reef, have your reef hook ready to hook-on. Once secure and settled, relax and watch the parade of sharks and schooling fish.

Special features - The Reef Hook is a truly a Palauan invention. The hook was designed to keep your hands free and to prevent damage to the reef, while facing strong currents. On one end of the hook is a large metal hook; on the other end is a safety clip that attaches to your BCD, with a 6-foot (2 meter) length of cord. If you are a photographer a reef hook is a must! It is highly recommended you use the reef hook any time you want to stop and the current is blowing you off your focus. Reef hooks are available at all dive shops in Palau. The Safety Sausage is an inflatable red cylinder of flexible plastic cloth that is used to mark your position on the surface. They come in many sizes and styles. The sausage is a very effective and inexpensive safety device. Use of the sausage is advised when surfacing in high boat traffic areas, when separated from your dive group and during rough weather. If you do not have one, a Safety Sausage is available at the Fish 'n Fins Dive Boutique. 

Napoleon wrasse meeting divers at Blue Corner Palau


Fascinating Facts about Blue Corner Palau

Most people believe Blue Corner acquired its name from the deep beautiful blue open ocean as seen at the Corner. The truth is, however, more interesting. Years ago the dive guides, though very familiar with the dive site at the Blue Holes, would exit the holes and continue the dive off to the right.

One day Francis Toribiong, known as Mr. Dive Palau and founder of Fish 'n Fins the pioneer dive shop in Palau, decided to go along the reef to the left. He could not believe his eyes, hundreds, maybe even thousands of fish of every color, size, and description! Francis discovered Blue Corner purely by chance. In describing how to get to the dive site, Francis told the other dive guides, Go to the Blue Holes, and then go to the left until you come to the corner. That is how this unique and beautiful dive site became known as the Blue Corner. 


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Sunday, 11 November 2018 08:14

Shark Conservation with Fish 'n Fins Palau

A couple of days ago, at our Barracuda Restaurant, Tova gave one of her famous Shark Presentations to a group of guests who were very interested with the work of the Micronesian Shark Foundation, an organization founded by Tova & Navot Bornovski and members of the Fish ’n Fins staff.

Friday, 02 November 2018 16:45

Shark Week Palau 2020

Shark Conservation Palau

It was in 2002 when Tova Harel Bornovski, her husband Navot and members of the staff of Fish ’n Fins, all experienced divers and shark enthusiasts decided to do more than just watch. They founded the Micronesian Shark Foundation to help raise awareness of the importance of sharks and to protect them in the waters of Palau. They invested a lot of time, energy, enthusiasm and money to promote shark protection and highlight this matter to foreign visitors and locals alike.

The world's first Shark Sanctuary in Palau

In 2009 Palau created the world’s first Shark Sanctuary and hence spiked a worldwide conservation effort. Palau has created a 500.000 square kilometer NO-TAKING ZONE, which has many benefits including being home to 135 endangered or vulnerable species of sharks and rays.

As one of it’s educational programs the Micronesian Shark Foundation started Shark Week Palau. This event has been a big success ever since and divers from all over the world have come to participate.

Shark Week 2020 is the 18th annual Shark Week Palau.

We’d love to extend an invitation to all Shark Lovers, their friends and families to come and join.

When: March 02-09, 2020

Where: Koror Palau

Operator: Fish’n Fins Palau

Event: 5 days of dedicated shark diving, one day of early morning diving, dives around Koror, Peleliu and Palau’s northern reefs. Evening seminars and presentations of MSF organizers and International experts, workshop & shark movie. Last night Gala Dinner Buffet, with Palauan Delicacies.

Price: As the costs vary depending on your chosen hotel we would like you to inquire individually with Fish’n Fins Palau - This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Each participant will receive a special “Shark Week Palau 2020” t-shirt, a Micronesian Shark Foundation coloring book and the chance to win a price in our raffle. 

We will post a detailed event program 60 days prior to Shark Week Palau 2020.

We hope to see you and your friend at Shark Week Palau 2020 :-)

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